Nail Trimming

While your assistant has the bird in the towel, trim the bird's nails. Some birds, such as lutino cockatiels, have

Trim your bird's nails in the smallest increments possible, removing only the hook on each nail.

Trim your bird's nails in the smallest increments possible, removing only the hook on each nail.

light-colored nails, which make it easier for owners to see where the nail stops and the blood and nerve supply (or quick) begins. In lutinos, the quick is generally seen as a pink color inside the nail. Owners of other parrot species will have to pare down their birds' nails carefully to ensure that they do not cut the quick.

You will need to remove only tiny portions of the nail to keep your pet's claws trimmed. Generally, a good guideline to follow is to only remove the hook on each nail, and to do this in the smallest increments possible. Stop well before you reach the quick. If you do happen to cut the nail short enough to make it bleed, apply styptic powder, followed by direct pressure, to stop the bleeding.

Bathing

Offer your bird a chance to bathe every day. This can be accomplished in several ways. Pet stores sell baths that attach to the side of a bird cage. If you own a kind of bird that will get in this bath or is small enough to get in, it's a good way to offer a bath because it keeps the mess under control. Most small-to-medium-sized birds, such as Finches, Canaries, Parrotlets, Cockatiels and Quaker Parrots, will lake a bath in a shallow dish. Make sure the water just covers your bird's feet and that she can easily get out of the bath dish. Birds cannot swim 114 and may have difficulty flying with wet feathers.

Most larger birds, and some small-to-medium-sized g birds as well, enjoy bathing in the mist of a spray bot- Pel Bird tie. Always use fresh, warm water to spray your bird. Grooming

Establish a routine and use the same spray bottle every time; use that bottle for nothing else to reduce the risk of exposing your bird to a dangerous chemical.

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