Notes

Our babies soon figured out how to cope with an earth-bound mama, and came whenever we whistled. Within a few weeks they were flying free all around Peabody Street, returning to our house and squawking whenever they wanted an easy meal. Jake stayed in the neighborhood for weeks, mingling with other jays, many in migratory flocks, and coming home less and less. Sneakers never left our yard for long she preferred human company. Not all species are ready to say good-bye to summer. Some robins...

H otee

Fork-tailed Flycatchers, elegant creatures belonging in southeastern Mexico and Central and South America, have appeared somewhere in the United States or Canada every year since 1970, usually in autumn. Sightings are as unexpected, and almost as unbelievable, as apparitions of Elvis. Three times Frank Freese saw one on his Columbia County property in mid-November 1978. He brought ornithologists to the spot, but the bird appeared for Frank alone. Fortunately, his photographs were more...

Note

The prettiest and jauntiest of our Hawks, and yet no prig is how early American ornithologist Elliot Coues described the American Kestrel. William Brewster, another nineteenth-century scientist, called it most light-hearted and frolicsome. Kestrels return to the North Country in March after wintering in the southern states and Mexico. Driving to Port Wing, we usually count at least a dozen, and even children caught up in the escapades of Mario Brothers look up. Kestrels hunt in open country,...