Block nest boxes from fresh trunks

You can also use fresh tree trunks, dividing them into four sections longitudinally (see diagram), though this is much more laborious than using ready made woodpecker homes. Older broadleaved trees with rotted interiors are easier to hollow out, saw up, and make good nest boxes from.

A strip of wood, which should be longer than the eventual nest box, is fastened onto one of the four sections; 3 -4 holes are drilled through the section and nails hammered through the holes into the lath. Using a strong pair of pincers, the nails are bent on theouiside. An entrance hole-is then drilled as follows: 3.1 cm for pied flycatcher, marsh tit, blue tit, crested tit, and coal tit; 3.5 cm for great tit, house sparrow, and tree sparrow; 5 cm for starling, nuthatch, wryneck, and swift.

[f you want your box to have a moveable floor which will facilitate cleaning, use a piece of hardwood sawn to the right size. Attach it with a nail in such a way that the bottom can swing outwards. The bottom is held in place with a nail which can be swung to the side when the box is to be cleaned.

The roof should be of hardwood. The various parts of the nest box arc fastened together with small nails at both ends of the hollowed out block. You can also tlx steel wire around the nest box by means of staples above and below the entrance hole. The wire is then drawn tight using heavy pincers, so that the nest box is securely held.

Baulk of limber 35cm long, 20cm in diameter, cut in half, longitudinally

Cut in halt again

Cut the wood from the centre of each of the quartered logs, leaving 4-5cm of wood with the bafk on the outside.

Baulk of limber 35cm long, 20cm in diameter, cut in half, longitudinally

Cut in halt again

Cut the wood from the centre of each of the quartered logs, leaving 4-5cm of wood with the bafk on the outside.

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