No Flying Allowed

Penguin Wing Movement Speed Direction

The short, compact wings look like flippers. They are essential to the penguin's underwater movements. The wings work like flippers. The foot with four joined toes pointing backward and the tail steer the direction of the dive. When looking for food, penguins need to leave the water and take a breath between plunges. When resting in the water, they move slowly. They float on the surface with their heads up and balance their bodies with their wings and feet. The keel-shaped sternum of flying and...

How They Communicate

Ound is an important form of expression in the lives of birds. Birds' sounds can be of two types calls and songs. The former have a simple acoustic structure, with few notes. They are associated with coordinating the activities of a group, establishing communication between parents and their young, and maintaining contact between birds during migration. Songs, on the other hand, are more complex in rhythm and modulation. They are controlled by the sex hormones, primarily the male hormones. For...

Endangered Species

Endangered Bird Species

Since early civilization, people have affected the Earth's environment. The cutting of trees in rainforests and woodlands has destroyed many bird habitats, the loss of which is the leading cause of bird extinctions today. Also, the introduction of animals such as cats, dogs, and rats to new areas has created a threat for many bird species. Indirect poisoning with pesticides, the trafficking of exotic birds as pets, and the sale of feathers have done further damage to many species. Fortunately,...

The Annual Cycle

Marine Birds

The annual cycle of seasons is like the daily cycle of night and day. Fluctuations in the intensity of light over time create a series of physiological and behavioral changes in birds, whether throughout the year or throughout the day. This biological clock is clearly reflected in birds' reproduction and migrations. Changes in light that are detected by a bird's retinas induce the secretion of melatonin by the pineal gland. The blood level of this hormone acts on the hypothalamus-hypophysis...

Freshwater Birds

This group includes birds that vary greatly from common kingfishers to ducks to storks and covers a wide spectrum. Freshwater birds live in rivers, lakes, and ponds for at least part of the year and are perfectly adapted to aquatic life. Some are excellent swimmers, whereas others are great divers. An important group wades in watercourses with long legs as they fish. Freshwater birds have a varied diet and are mostly omnivorous. The order Anseriformes includes birds that are very familiar to...

Birth in Detail

When a chick is about to hatch, it starts to make itself heard from inside the egg. This allows it to communicate with its parents. It then starts to peck at the shell with its tiny egg tooth, which is lost after birth. Next, it turns inside the egg and opens a crack with new perforations, at the same time pushing with its neck and legs until it manages to stick out its head. This job demands a lot of effort and can take 30 to 40 minutes or, in the case of kiwis and albatrosses, even three to...

First the

Marine Birds

Birds may have inherited their reproductive method from their predecessors, the theropod reptiles. In general, they lay as many eggs as they can care for until the chicks become independent. Highly adapted to the environment, the eggs of the same species have varying shapes and colors. These variations help keep them safe from predators. They also vary greatly in size the egg of an ostrich is 2,000 times bigger than that of a hummingbird. Most birds' organs are formed in the first hours of...

Speed Records

Bar Headed Geese Altitude

The world of birds is amazing when expressed in numbers. Most birds travel at speeds between 25 and 45 miles per hour 40-70 km h , but when diving, peregrine falcons can reach more than 200 miles per hour 320 km h . Many species can reach an altitude of 6,600 feet 2,000 m , although climbers have seen geese flying over the Himalayas at more than 26,000 feet 8,000 m . The fastest swimmer is the Gentoo penguin, which can swim 22.4 miles per hour 36 km h . Considering its small size, it is...

Migration Routes

IS THE DISTANCE THEY FLY NONSTOP ACROSS THE GULF OF MEXICO. THEY DO IT IN JUST 20 HOURS. In order to survive, millions of birds from all over the world start a journey every fall in search of better climates. The instinct of migrating, which other animals share with birds, was acquired after a long evolutionary process. Some birds fly thousands of miles through mountain ranges others follow the course of a river without stopping until they reach their destination others land after a short trip....

Birds

Britannica Illustrated Science Library Encyclopedia Britannica, Inc. Chicago London New Delhi Paris Seoul Sydney Taipei Tokyo Britannica Illustrated Science Library Idea and Concept of This Work Editorial Sol 90 Photo Credits Corbis, ESA, Getty Images, Daisy Gilardini The Image Bank Getty Images, Graphic News, NASA, National Geographic, Science Photo Library Illustrators Guido Arroyo, Pablo Aschei, Gustavo J. Caironi, Hern n Ca ellas, Leonardo C sar, Jos Luis Corsetti, Vanina Far as, Joana...

Bird Feather Development

Bird With Pine Feather Blog

Ings are highly modified arms that, through their unique structure and shape, enable most birds to fly. There are many types of wings they vary by species. For instance, penguins, which are flightless, use their wings for the specialized task of swimming. Among all wings that have existed in the animal kingdom, those of birds are the best for flying. Their wings are light and durable, and in some cases their shape and effectiveness can be modified during flight. To understand the relationship...

Flapping Flight

Flapping Flight Stroke Birds

Most flying birds use flapping flight all the time. It consists of moving through the air as if rowing with the wings. With each flap raising and lowering , the wing both sustains the bird in the air and pushes its body forward. There are different types of flapping flight and different rates of flapping. In general, the larger the bird, the more powerful and less frequent its flapping will be. Because flapping is an activity that consumes much energy, birds have adapted a variety of flight...

Exposed Legs

Taking a quick look at the extremities of birds, including their toes and claws, can help us learn about their behavior. The skin of their legs and feet can have some striking features. All these characteristics reveal information about the environments in which different groups of birds live, as well as about their diets. Scientists use these characteristics as a basis for classifying birds. The detailed study of the anatomy of a bird's leg and foot can offer useful information. The shape and...

Feathers

Superior Umbilicus Feather

Feathers are the feature that distinguishes birds from all other animals. They make birds strikingly colorful, protect them against cold and intense heat, enable them to move easily through the air and water, and hide them from enemies. Feathers are also one of the reasons why human beings have domesticated, caught, and hunted birds. A bird's set of feathers is called its plumage, and its color is essential for reproductive success. The edge presents an excellent aerodynamic profile for flying....

Origin

Respiratory System Marine Birds

The evolution of birds is a debated theme in science. The most widespread theory states that birds descend from theropods, dinosaurs that walked on two legs. Fossils of dinosaur specimens with feathers have been found, but Archaeopteryx, a primitive bird that lived 150 million years ago, is the oldest relative known. Completely covered with feathers, it had a pair of wings that enabled it to fly. However, it retained many dinosaur traits. lived in the Jurassic Period, 150 million years ago....

Different Types of Bills

The beak, or bill, is a projecting structure of horn made out of the same material as the nails that grows as it is worn down. In the case of adult birds, bill size remains constant. The bill is joined to the skull in a way that allows for the movement of the lower mandible and, thus, the opening of the mouth. Most birds depend on their bills to get food. There M which differ in size, shape, k There is a close relationship between a bird's bill and its diet. Because the bill serves to pick up,...