Western wattled cuckooshrike

Campephaga lobata

TAXONOMY

Ceblepyris lobatus Temminck, 1824, Gold Coast (Ghana). OTHER COMMON NAMES

English: Ghana cuckoo-shrike; French: Echenilleur a barbillons; German: Westlicher lappenraupenfresser; Spanish: Oruguero Occidental.

PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS

8.3 in (21 cm); 1.0-1.3 oz (29-37 g). Male has glossy black head and black bill with orange wattles on gape. Breast and flanks orange-yellow, wings greenish yellow. Female slightly duller with greenish forehead and crown.

DISTRIBUTION

East Sierra Leone, Liberia, west Cote d'lvoire, south Ghana, one record in southeast Nigeria.

HABITAT

Upper Guinea forest zone, in the canopy of primary or tall lowland rainforest, often near rivers, and in open swamp-forest. Also recorded in logged forest, Terminalia plantations, disturbed forest, and managed forest.

BEHAVIOR

Usually seen singly or in pairs, often with a mixed bird party; inconspicuous.

FEEDING ECOLOGY AND DIET

The diet includes caterpillars, grasshoppers, mantids, and seeds.

REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY

Descriptions of the nest and eggs are not available. Birds from Liberia are known to be in breeding condition in February and during the months of August to November.

CONSERVATION STATUS

Although it has apparently adapted to secondary habitat, this bird is seriously threatened by massive forest destruction throughout its range. It is therefore considered Vulnerable. In 2000, it was locally rare to uncommon over much of its range.

SIGNIFICANCE TO HUMANS None known. ♦

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