Species accounts

Fasciated antshrike

Cymbilaimus lineatus

TAXONOMY

Cymbilaimus lineatus Leach, 1814. OTHER COMMON NAMES

English: Bamboo antshrike; French: Batara fascié German: Zebra-Ameisenwürger; Spanish: Batará Franjeado.

PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS

7 in (17-18 cm); heavy hooked bill and red iris.

DISTRIBUTION

Southern Central America and north-central South America; from Honduras to Panama, and in Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, eastern Peru, northern Bolivia, and western Amazonian Brazil.

HABITAT

Typically below 3,300 ft (1,000 m) in humid tropical forest; vine-tangled and shrubby borders of streams and rivers and tree-fall openings in intact forest; also, mature secondary forest.

BEHAVIOR

Nonmigratory, territory-defending pairs forage widely at various levels of a dense forest canopy. Song is a series of 6-8 soft, repeated whistles.

FEEDING ECOLOGY AND DIET

Feed in dense foliage on insects and other arthropods.

REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY

Monogamous pairs bond for life, typically lay two eggs, and share incubation and care of nestlings and fledglings.

CONSERVATION STATUS

Not threatened. Locally widespread and abundant. SIGNIFICANCE TO HUMANS

No direct significance, except for the indirect economic benefits of bird-watching and ecotourism. ♦

Undulated antshrike

Frederickena unduligera

TAXONOMY

Frederickena unduliger Pelzeln, 1868.

OTHER COMMON NAMES

French: Batara onde German: Mormor-Ameisenwurger; Spanish: Batara Ondulado.

PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS

9 in (23 cm); relatively short tail, a massive hooked bill, and brown to pale-orange iris.

DISTRIBUTION

Northwestern South America, including Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, and western Amazonian Brazil.

HABITAT

Typically below 2,300 ft (700 m) in humid, lowland tropical forest; dense undergrowth vegetation and vine-laden tree-falls within terra firme (non-flooded) forest.

BEHAVIOR

Nonmigratory, territory-defending pairs that forage close to or on the ground. Song is a series of 11-16, high-pitched, repeated notes. The head crest may be raised when calling, and the tail may wag as well.

FEEDING ECOLOGY AND DIET

Feed in dense foliage on insects and other arthropods.

REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY

Monogamous pairs bond for life, typically lay two eggs, and share incubation and care of nestlings and fledglings.

CONSERVATION STATUS

Uncommon to rare species, but not formally threatened. SIGNIFICANCE TO HUMANS

No direct significance, except for the indirect economic benefits of bird-watching and ecotourism. ♦

Giant antshrike

Batara cinerea

TAXONOMY

Batara cinereus Vieillot, 1819. OTHER COMMON NAMES

French: Batara géant; German: Batara; Spanish: Batara Grande. PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS

Largest species of the formicariids: 12.5-14 in (30.5-35.5 cm), with a relatively long tail and a massive bill.

DISTRIBUTION

East-central South America, including the eastern slope of the Andes Mountains in Bolivia, northern Argentina, and in a separate range in southeastern Brazil and northeastern Argentina.

HABITAT

Up to 9,800 ft (3,000 m) in humid tropical and montane forest, forest-edges, and dense thickets in higher woodland; dense vegetation of the lower or middle parts of the forest canopy.

BEHAVIOR

Nonmigratory pairs defend a relatively large territory. They forage close to the ground or in the middle canopy. They are a rarely seen shy and skulking bird. Song is a loud, rather fast series of repeated, ringing, musical notes.

FEEDING ECOLOGY AND DIET

Feed in dense foliage on insects and other arthropods.

REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY

Monogamous pairs bond for life, typically lay two eggs, and share incubation and care of nestlings and fledglings.

CONSERVATION STATUS

Uncommon species but can be locally abundant, and not threatened.

SIGNIFICANCE TO HUMANS

No direct significance, except for the indirect economic benefits of bird-watching and ecotourism. ♦

Barred antshrike

Thamnophilus doliatus

TAXONOMY

Thamnophilus doliatus Linnaeus, 1764. OTHER COMMON NAMES

English: Chapman's antshrike; French: Batara rayé; German: Bindenwollrucken; Spanish: Choca Barreada.

PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS

6.5 in (16 cm), with a yellow iris, long tail, and a large hooked bill.

DISTRIBUTION

Much of tropical South America and Central America; east of the Andes as far south as Bolivia, Paraguay, and northern Argentina; widespread farther north except for the heart of Brazilian Amazon; as far north as southern Mexico.

HABITAT

Up to 6,600 ft (2,000 m) in tropical forest-edges, thickets, open woodland, and in vegetated clearings and gardens, ranging from humid to more arid habitats.

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