Redbilled hornbill

Tockus erythrorhynchus

SUBFAMILY

Bucerotinae

TAXONOMY

Buceros erythrorhynchus Temminck, 1823, Podor, Senegal. Four subspecies.

OTHER COMMON NAMES

English: African red-billed hornbill, South African red-billed hornbill, Damaraland red-billed hornbill; French: Calao a bec rouge; German: Rotschnabeltoko; Spanish: Toco Piquirorojo.

PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS

13.8 in (35 cm); female 0.2-0.44 lb (90-200 g), male 0.27-0.48 lb (124-220 g). Small, black and white with spotted wing coverts; long slender red bill with small casque.

DISTRIBUTION

T. e. erythrorhynchus: Niger Delta to Ethiopia and Somalia, south to Tanzania; T. e. kempi: Southern Mauritania, Senegal to Niger Delta; T. e. rufirostris: Southern Angola, northern Namibia, Zambia, southern Malawi and northeastern South Africa; T. e. damarensis: Northwestern and central Namibia.

HABITAT

Open savannas, woodland, and dry thorn-scrub. BEHAVIOR

Territorial, maintaining boundaries by calling and displaying on conspicuous perch early morning.

FEEDING ECOLOGY AND DIET

Active forager. Commonly joins other birds when feeding.

REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY

Lays two to seven eggs one to two months after start of rains. Incubation 23-25 days; fledging 39-50 days and female emerges with first fledgling. Remaining chicks reseal the nest cavity using their own droppings and undigested food. Nesting success ranged from 90% to 94% in Transvaal and Kenya, respectively but overall productivity is around 1.5 chicks.

CONSERVATION STATUS

Not threatened. Widespread and common, mixing well with domestic stock on open range as long as sufficient nest trees available.

SIGNIFICANCE TO HUMANS None known. ♦

0 0

Post a comment