Nuttings flycatcher

Myiarchus nuttingi

SUBFAMILY

Tyranninae

TAXONOMY

Myiarchus nuttingi Ridgway, 1882. Monotypic. OTHER COMMON NAMES

English: Pale-throated flycatcher; French: Tyran de Nutting; German: Blasskehltyrann; Spanish: Atrapamoscas de Nutting.

PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS

7.25 in (18.5 cm). Plumage includes a dark gray crown (sometimes with a tinge of cinnamon), olive-brown upperparts, two white wingbars, wing coverts and secondaries edged with white, cinnamon-edged primaries, dusky central tail feathers, yellow belly and undertail coverts, and pale gray throat and breast. Interior of mouth is orange. Sexes are similar. Almost identical in appearance to ash-throated flycatcher (Myiarchus cinerascens); distinguishable in the field only by song.

DISTRIBUTION

Western Mexico to western Costa Rica; accidental to southeastern Arizona.

HABITAT

Prefers semiarid deciduous slopes and thorny thickets.

BEHAVIOR

Lives singly or in pairs. Nonmigratory. Song is a quick, loud, chattering "wheep! wheep!", in addition to a repeated "ki di-di-dir!"

FEEDING ECOLOGY AND DIET

Eats insects and some berries. Most often snatches prey from foliage while hovering; also hawks prey in midair and returns to perch.

REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY

Monogamous. Nest is built by both sexes in a preformed burrow and lined with grasses, rootlets, weeds, and feathers. Female incubates one to two clutches of three to five eggs per year for 14 days. Young are fed by both parents and fledge at 14 to 16 days.

CONSERVATION STATUS

Not threatened.

SIGNIFICANCE TO HUMANS None known. ♦

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