Noisy scrubbird

Atrichornis clamosus

TAXONOMY

Atrichia clamosa Gould, 1844, Western Australia. OTHER COMMON NAMES

English: Western scrub-bird; French: Atrichorne bruyant; German: Braunbach-Dickichtvogel; Spanish: Achaparrado Occidental.

PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS Male 9.1 in (23 cm), female 7.7 in (19.5 cm); male 1.7 oz (52g); female 1.2 oz (34 g). Upperparts brown with fine dark barring. Rufous-brown on lower belly, grading to off-white on breast. Male also has black patch on upper breast and throat. Bill, eyes, and legs brown.

DISTRIBUTION

Far southwestern corner of Western Australia.

HABITAT

Low forest, thicket, and heath with dense lower stratum of shrubs and sedges.

Atrichornis clamosus

BEHAVIOR

Males employ a loud territorial song supplemented by various calls. Mimicry rarely used. Females generally silent, producing only soft calls.

FEEDING ECOLOGY AND DIET

Feeds on invertebrates, and occasionally small vertebrates, flushed from leaf litter or low vegetation.

REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY

Breeds April to October. Dome nest similar to rufous scrub-bird except only lower half of inside lined with cardboard-like substance. Clutch size is one.

CONSERVATION STATUS

Vulnerable. Recently downgraded from Endangered thanks to the success of an ongoing translocation and management program initiated over 35 years ago. Since rediscovery of the species in 1961, its total population size has been increased from less than 50 to almost 600 breeding territories.

SIGNIFICANCE TO HUMANS None known ♦

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