Cinereous antshrike

Thamnomanes caesius

TAXONOMY

Thamnomanes caesia Temminck, 1820. OTHER COMMON NAMES

English: Bluish-slate antshrike; French: Batara cendré German: Buschwürgerling; Spanish: Choca Guayanesa.

PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS 6 in (14.5 cm), with a long tail.

DISTRIBUTION

Much of northern tropical South America; east of the Andes in Venezuela, Guyana, Colombia, Ecuador, northeastern Peru, Amazonian Brazil, and northeastern Bolivia; coastal eastern Brazil.

HABITAT

Up to 2,650 ft (800 m) in humid, lowland tropical forest, especially in terra firme (or non-flooded) habitats and mature secondary forest; lower-canopy habitats.

BEHAVIOR

Nonmigratory pairs defend a breeding territory, but may also associate with mixed-species flocks. The vocalizations are loud and distinct, and help to organize local, mixed-species flocks. Song is a series of notes and trills.

BEHAVIOR

Nonmigratory pairs defend a breeding territory. Both sexes sing a fast series of nasal notes; there are also several other calls.

FEEDING ECOLOGY AND DIET

Feed in dense foliage on insects and other arthropods.

REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY

Monogamous pairs bond for life, typically lay two eggs, and share incubation and care of nestlings and fledglings.

CONSERVATION STATUS

Not threatened. Widespread and relatively abundant.

SIGNIFICANCE TO HUMANS

No direct significance, except for the indirect economic benefits of bird-watching and ecotourism. ♦

FEEDING ECOLOGY AND DIET

Feed in dense foliage on insects and other arthropods. Prey is often caught in the air.

REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY

Monogamous pairs bond for life, typically lay two eggs, and share incubation and care of nestlings and fledglings.

CONSERVATION STATUS

Not threatened. Widespread and relatively abundant.

SIGNIFICANCE TO HUMANS

No direct significance, except for the indirect economic benefits of bird-watching and ecotourism. ♦

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