Blackfaced antthrush

Formicarius analis

TAXONOMY

Formicarius analis d'Orbigny & Lafresnaye, 1837. OTHER COMMON NAMES

French: Tétéma coq-de-bois; German: Schwarzkehl-Ameisendrossel; Spanish: Chululú Enmascarado.

PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS

7 in (17-18 cm), with a black iris and white eye-ring, and short tail held erect.

DISTRIBUTION

Amazonian region of northern South America and in tropical Central America; from tropical southern Mexico, through appropriate habitats in Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama, coastal Venezuela, the Guyanas, northern and central Colombia, eastern Ecuador, eastern Peru, northern Bolivia, and widely in Amazonian Brazil.

HABITAT

Below 3,300 ft (1,000 m) in extremely dense undergrowth vegetation of humid tropical forest and mature secondary woodland.

BEHAVIOR

Nonmigratory pairs defend a breeding territory. May forage near swarms of army ants. Song of males is a series of up to 10 fading notes.

FEEDING ECOLOGY AND DIET

Glean insects and other arthropods from foliage in dense vegetation close to the ground.

REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY

Monogamous pairs bond for life, typically lay two eggs, and share incubation and care of nestlings and fledglings.

CONSERVATION STATUS

Not threatened. Widespread and relatively abundant. SIGNIFICANCE TO HUMANS

No direct significance, except for the indirect economic benefits of bird-watching and ecotourism. ♦

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