Berthelots pipit

Anthus berthelotii

TAXONOMY

Anthus berthelotii Bolle, 1862, Canary Islands. Two subspecies. OTHER COMMON NAMES

French: Pipit de Berthelot; German: Kanarenpieper; Spanish: Bisbita caminero.

PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS

5.5 in (14 cm); 0.6 oz (16-17 g). Brownish-gray upperparts with white brow stripe. Underparts buff-gray with dark streaks.

DISTRIBUTION

A. b. berthelotii: Canary Islands and Ilhas Selvagens; Anthus b. madeirensis: Madeira.

HABITAT

Mostly island habitats; prefers dry, open areas (including rocky plains and slopes) with bushes, grass, and herbaceous vegetation; also open grasslands, cultivation, vine-clad slopes, dunes, areas of volcanic rock, and open pine forests.

BEHAVIOR

Territorial, possibly throughout the year, but forms small groups in winter. Often very tame. Runs rapidly; jumps nimbly over boulders. Sedentary; not recorded outside island breeding range.

FEEDING ECOLOGY AND DIET

Eats insects and seeds. Forages on the ground, climbing over small plants.

REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY

Monogamous; breeds January through August. Nest is a cup of stems, lined hair, wool and feathers; on ground under low plant, bushes or stone; female builds. Lays two to five eggs. Possibly double-brooded.

CONSERVATION STATUS

Not threatened. Locally common throughout most islands where it occurs, but has declined on Gran Canaria.

SIGNIFICANCE TO HUMANS None known. ♦

Was this article helpful?

0 0

Post a comment