Whitethroated treecreeper

Cormobates leucophaeus

TAXONOMY

Certhia leucophaea Latham, 1802, Port Jackson, New South Wales, Australia.

OTHER COMMON NAMES

English: Papuan treecreeper, little treecreeper; French: Echelet Leucophee; German: Weisskehl-Baumrutscher; Spanish: Sube Palo de Garganta Blanca.

PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS

6 in (15 cm); 0.8 oz (22 g). Brownish gray upperparts with white throat and rufous patch at lower cheek; breast is buff streaked with white.

DISTRIBUTION

Eastern Australia from north Queensland to Adelaide region. Distinct subspecies in northeast Queensland, Clarke Range of central coastal Queensland, and Mount Lofty Ranges of South Australia.

HABITAT

Tropical, subtropical, and temperate rainforests, eucalypt forests, and woodlands.

BEHAVIOR

Solitary or in pairs in strongly defended territories. Strident whistling and piping, and more subdued chattering calls, display by rapidly flicking tail open and closed with audible clicking sound.

FEEDING ECOLOGY AND DIET

Climbs up trunks and along branches of rough-barked eucalyptus and other trees, gleaning from the surface and probing into bark for ants and other arthropods.

REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY

Breeds August-January, but mostly September/October, in hollows in the trunks or branches of living or dead trees, often eu-calypts. Two or three eggs, incubated by female for 22-24 days. Nestlings fed by both parents, but only females brood chicks; fledging at 26 days.

CONSERVATION STATUS

Secure, common and copes well with habitat fragmentation.

SIGNIFICANCE TO HUMANS None known. ♦

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