Striped honeyeater

Plectorhyncha lanceolata

TAXONOMY

Plectrorhyncha lanceolata Gould, 1838, New South Wales, Australia.

Anthochaera carunculata I Resident

Plectorhyncha lanceolata I Resident

OTHER COMMON NAMES

English: Lanceolated honeyeater; French: Méliphage lancéolé; German: Strichelhonigfresser; Spanish: Pájaro Azúcar Gris.

PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS

8.5 in (22 cm); 1.4 oz (40 g). Cheek and forehead to nape is dark with white stripes. Underparts a pinkish buff with grayish upperparts and tail.

DISTRIBUTION

Eastern Australia, from mid-north Queensland to northern Victoria and west to Yorke Peninsula, especially inland from Great Dividing Range.

HABITAT

Riparian woodland with Casuarina and mallee and other semiarid woodlands with eucalyptus, acacia, and native pine.

BEHAVIOR

In pairs or small groups, emit an attractive whistling song. Generally sedentary, but exhibit some, probably local, movements.

FEEDING ECOLOGY AND DIET

Take nectar from eucalyptus, mistletoes, and other plants, and occasionally eat fruits and seeds. Insects and spiders are gleaned from foliage and bark or captured in the air.

REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY

Breed from August to January in nest suspended from drooping foliage, often near nests of gray butcherbird (Cracticus torquatus). Clutch from two to five eggs (usually three). Both parents apparently incubate and occasionally have helpers feeding young, which hatch at 16-17 days and fledge at 16-17 days. Parasitized by pallid cuckoo.

CONSERVATION STATUS Not threatened.

SIGNIFICANCE TO HUMANS Occasionally regarded as a pest at orchards. ♦

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