Redcheeked cordonbleu

Uraeginthus bengalus

SUBFAMILY

Estrildinae

TAXONOMY

Fringilla bengalus Linnaeus, 1766. OTHER COMMON NAMES

English: Cordon-bleu, red-cheeked blue waxbill; French: Cor-donbleu à joues rouges; German: Schmetterlingsastrild; Spanish: Coliazul Bengali.

Uraeginthus bengalus I Resident

PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS

4.9-5.1 in (12.5-13 cm). Sexually dimorphic; male has a red spot on cheeks, a pink bill, light brown or pink-brown legs; female lacks red spots on cheeks, feathers are paler than for the male. Juveniles lack blue on flanks and have a darker bill.

DISTRIBUTION

Southern Mauritania, east to Ethiopia, south to northern Zambia. An introduced population exists in Hawaii.

HABITAT

Occurs in grassland, savanna, thorn scrub, dry woodland, forest edges and clearings, gardens and villages, roadsides, and cultivated areas.

BEHAVIOR

Found in pairs or small flocks during the breeding season. Otherwise, this species can gather in large sometimes mixed-species flocks. The call is a "tsee-tsee-tsee." The song is a "te tchee-wa-tcheee" or a "ssee-deedelee-deedelee-ssee-see."

FEEDING ECOLOGY AND DIET

Feeds on the ground on a variety of seeds and insects, including termites which are occasionally caught in flight.

REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY

Uses old Ploceus weaver nests or builds its own round nest of grass several meters off the ground. Three to six white eggs are incubated for 11 days.

CONSERVATION STATUS

CITES: Appendix III. Not considered threatened by the IUCN. SIGNIFICANCE TO HUMANS

This species becomes accustomed to humans and can be found in villages and gardens. It is also a commonly kept and bred aviary bird. ♦

0 0

Post a comment