Jamaican blackbird

Nesopsar nigerrimus

TAXONOMY

Icterus nigerrimus Osburn, 1859, Jamaica. OTHER COMMON NAMES

French: Carouge de la Jamaïque; German: Bromelienstärling; Spanish: Pradero Jamaicano.

PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS

7 in (18 cm); 1.4 oz (39 g). Sexes similar in coloration. Uniformly black.

DISTRIBUTION

Resident in Jamaica.

HABITAT

Wet montane forests.

HABITAT

Woodland edge and open woodlands.

BEHAVIOR

Territorial during the breeding season. Males defend a territory with songs and chasing. In winter, solitary or found in small groups.

FEEDING ECOLOGY AND DIET

Forage mostly in trees, gleaning insects, or eating fruit and insects. Also forage on ground or low in vegetation.

REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY

Monogamous. Females (sometimes with some assistance from males) weave a bag-like nest of grasses, which is sus

BEHAVIOR

Territorial. Jamaican blackbirds spend most of their time foraging in the forest canopy. They vocalize frequently.

FEEDING ECOLOGY AND DIET

Forage in trees, searching epiphytes for invertebrate food. REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY

Monogamous. The bulky nest is constructed of rootlets and epiphytic orchids, and is placed against the trunk of a tree in the lower canopy. Two eggs are laid in May-July. Incubation is about 14 days. Single brooded.

CONSERVATION STATUS

Endangered. Although locally common, they are found only in places where there is mature rainforest, habitat that is being destroyed for coffee plantations.

SIGNIFICANCE TO HUMANS None known. ♦

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