Hooded warbler

Wilsonia citrina

SUBFAMILY

Parulinae

TAXONOMY

Wilsonia citrina Boddaert, 1783, Louisiana. OTHER COMMON NAMES

French: Paruline a capuchón; German: Kapuzenwaldsänger; Spanish: Reinita Encapuchada.

PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS

5-6 in (12.7-15.3 cm). Dark olive above, yellow below, and a yellow face. Conspicuous bristles at the angles of its fairly wide bill. Male also has a black cowl that extends from his throat to the top of his head.

DISTRIBUTION

Breeds in the eastern half of the United States from the Gulf states north to central Iowa, Ohio, and parts of New York. Winters in Central America.

HABITAT

Undergrowth of mature deciduous woods.

BEHAVIOR

Like a flycatcher, the male often catches flying arthropods on the wing. The females, however, generally forage on foliage and branches nearer ground level. The male's loud ringing song, "wee te wee tee o," proclaims its presence in thickets, often near water. Unlike most other warblers, the sexes frequently segregate in the wintering grounds.

FEEDING ECOLOGY AND DIET

Mainly arthropods.

REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY

It builds its nest among bushes and climbers. The nest itself is firmly built of leaves and grasses and lined with rootlets or fine grass. The female lays three or four speckled eggs, similar to those of many other wood warblers. The young hatch a little more than a week later. This species typically produces two broods a year.

CONSERVATION STATUS

Not threatened.

SIGNIFICANCE TO HUMANS None known. ♦

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