Greater Sulawesi honeyeater

Myza sarasinorum

TAXONOMY

Myza sarasinorum Meyer and Wiglesworth, 1895, Matinan Mountains, north Celebes (Sulawesi).

OTHER COMMON NAMES

English: White-eared myza, greater streaked honeyeater, spot-headed honeyeater; French: Méliphage a points; German: Saras-inhonigfresser; Spanish: Pájaro Azúcar de Cabeza Moteada.

PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS

8 in (20 cm); weight about 1 oz (30 g). Long body and long, decurved bill. Head black with pinkish white patch behind eye.

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Moho bishopi

Resident

Myza sarasinorum

I Resident

Rufous from chin to vent, with breast and back mottled rufous brown. Brown rump and tail.

DISTRIBUTION

Sulawesi, with separate subspecies in northern, central, and southeastern parts of the island.

HABITAT

Montane and elfin moss forest, at 5,000-8,500 ft (1,700-2,800 m). BEHAVIOR

Occur singly or in pairs, active and pugnacious. Described as squirrel-like in the way that they scurry about the branches of moss-draped trees. Wide variety of calls, including zunk, kep, kik, kuik, zip, and tuck. Also emit a high-pitched squeaky song.

FEEDING ECOLOGY AND DIET

Forage from the understory to the treetops, taking arthropods from epiphytes and probing flowers, especially flowers of gingers.

REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY Not known.

CONSERVATION STATUS

Not threatened. Common in suitable habitat.

SIGNIFICANCE TO HUMANS None known. ♦

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