Greater rhabdornis

Rhabdornis grandis

TAXONOMY

Rhabdornis grandis Salomonsen, 1953. OTHER COMMON NAMES

English: Long-billed rhabdornis; French: Rhabdornis a long bec; German: Langschnabel-Rhabdornis; Spanish: Trepador Filipino Grande.

PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS

This species has an average length of 6.7 in (17 cm) and weighs about 3.3 oz (93 g). The male is larger than the female, but the sexes are similar in coloring, with black or dark brown bills and brown eyes, and olive-gray legs. Upperparts are patterned with gray, brown, black, and white, in characteristic streak patterns. The face has a black mask with white lines above and below. The lower breast and belly are white.

DISTRIBUTION

The Cordillera and Sierra Madre on Luzon Island. HABITAT

Middle-elevation (330-3,300 ft; 100-1,000 m), tropical forest. BEHAVIOR

The greater rhabdornis forages in groups or mixed-species flocks in the upper levels of forests. Greater rhabdornises will often flock with stripe-headed rhabdornises in flowering or fruiting trees.

FEEDING ECOLOGY AND DIET

Forages like other rhabdornis species, hopping and jumping along branches, searching for and eating insects among leaves, bark, and flowers. It will vary its diet with nectar, seeds, and fruit.

REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY

Nests in tree holes. Enlarged gonads in May.

CONSERVATION STATUS

Uncommon, but not threatened.

SIGNIFICANCE TO HUMANS None known. ♦

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