Fortyspotted pardalote

Pardalotus quadragintus

TAXONOMY

Pardalotus quadragintus Gould, 1838, Tasmania. OTHER COMMON NAMES

English: Golden-rumped diamondbird; French: Pardalote de Tasmanie; German: Tasmanpanthervogel: Spanish: Pardalote de Cuarenta Manchas.

PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS

3.5-3.9 in (9-10 cm); 0.38 oz (10.7 g). Sexes similar in plumage. DISTRIBUTION

Restricted to southeastern Tasmanian coastal forests and woodlands.

HABITAT

Dry sclerophyll forest and woodlands; prefers white gum (Eucalyptus viminalis).

BEHAVIOR

Nests in loose colonies but forms flocks in winter, often with other species. Soft two-note call.

FEEDING ECOLOGY AND DIET

Gleans eucalypt foliage and twigs. Forages on a broad spectrum on invertebrates, but apparently does not take many scale insects as other pardalotes.

REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY

Often nest within 33 ft (10 m) of other nests in loose associations. The nest is a dome or cup of plant fibers, lined with grass or feathers, placed in a tree hollow up to 66 ft (20 m) above the ground. Clutch is three to five white eggs; incubation period 16 days, with fledging about a month later.

CONSERVATION STATUS

Endangered. Population declined in twentieth century, probably due to competition with spotted pardalotes (Pardalotus punctatus). Current population is probably about 3,000 birds in about six disjunct populations (several on islands). Has been the focus of a recovery team project. With habitat protection, population will probably stabilize.

SIGNIFICANCE TO HUMANS None known. ♦

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