Chowchilla

Orthonyx spaldingii

TAXONOMY

Orthonix spaldingii Ramsay, 1868, Rockingham Bay, Queensland, Australia. Three subspecies.

OTHER COMMON NAMES

English: Northern logrunner; French: Orthonyx de Spalding; German: Schwarzkopfflöter; Spanish: Corretroncos de Spalding.

PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS

11-11.8 in (28-30 cm); female 0.25-0.32 lb (113-144 g), male 0.33-0.47 lb (150-213 g). Dark brown upperparts; breast is

HABITAT

Rainforest.

BEHAVIOR

Territorial at all seasons, often living in family parties. Highly terrestrial. Often shy, but may be confiding when feeding. Generally unobtrusive except when calling. Loud, ringing "chow chowchilla chowry chook chook" or "chow chilla chow chow chilla"; also other growls, chucks.

FEEDING ECOLOGY AND DIET

Forages by vigorous scratching, excavating shallow depressions in ground. Eats insects and other terrestrial invertebrates; occasionally seeds.

REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY

Breeds almost year round, mainly April to August; one or two broods reared per season. Female lays a single white egg and is responsible for construction of nest, incubation of eggs, and

care of nestlings. Male provisions female during activities. Nest is a dome of sticks, twigs, and moss, side entrance hooded by moss, platform of sticks leading to entrance; on or near ground in clump of vegetation. Incubation, 25 days; fledging 22-27 days.

CONSERVATION STATUS

Not threatened. Although some reduction of range has occurred through habitat loss, this species is still common.

SIGNIFICANCE TO HUMANS None known. ♦

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